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that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey andew york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have re ad atme all of the airports in the new york area.at public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates th
economy slows down, u.s. exports may follow suit. hurricane sandy showed up in the latest report on jobless claims, making them artificially low. initial claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000 at the end of last week. the number is expected to be revised higher as more data is collected. the labor department says one state filed fewer claims because of power outages, while the storm boosted claims in other states where more people looking for relief. later in the program, we'll look at sandy's impact on retailers. >> tom: the biggest bank in america has the okay now from uncle sam to pay back shareholders. jpmorgan will be allowed to restart a stock buyback plan early next year. like all systemically important banks jpmorgan has to get regulatory approval to change its dividend or stock-repurchase plan. the regulators want banks to have enough financial firepower to withstand troubled times before the banks will spend money on share holders. jpmorgan's buyback strategy was suspended this year after it lost $6 billion when a derivative t
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines th as part of aour series: ouping with climate citnge. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown reports on the battle of the ground game, hard fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay iste one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drusniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the dtional law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding or the pbs newshour has been provided by: di ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
on worries that the costs of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, en though eney were outmanneer and outgunned.ne those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: this was another difficult day in the afterm
sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even stru
in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> this is awful, this is just beyond, it's terrible, it's awful, i am done. >> mother nature is really killing us right now. sorry for whatever we did, we will make it up to you. >> it's snowing, this is like insult to injury, we just had a hurricane, now we 're having a blizzard. >> sreenivasan: the worst was the wind-- gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour that blacked out customers who'd just had their power restored. by this morning, 750,000 homes and businesses were in the dark in the new york region-- 200,000 more than before the nor'easter hit. governor andrew cuomo charged utility companies planned poorly for "sandy" and are still playing catch-up. >> you look at what a utility company does and it basically comes down to wire and poles and crews and trucks. these are things you would want to have. how can you run out of poles? and then we have utility companies competing with each other to find the poles the way we competed to find crews and equipment. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, on the roads, the snow made bumper- to-bumper collisions a common sight, espec
benefits jumped to a one-and-a-half year high, surging 78,000, thanks to super- storm sandy. the total was 439,000. meantime, consumer inflation slowed to a one tenth of a percent increase, thanks to lower energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the economy is faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is
results don't even include the sales lift from superstorm sandy. home depot also raised its profit outlook for the year. if housing continues to improve, experts say it's a bullish sign for the rest of the economy. >> now, as we start to see residential investment recovery, that should help other sectors of the economy through demand for building materials, through more demand for other products-- furniture, you name it! >> reporter: she's optimistic housing will remain one of the few bright spots in an otherwise sluggish recovery. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: it was an unhappy earnings story in the third quarter for saks. the upscale department store said sales and profits were hurt by a modest spike in promotions. on top of that, saks expects sales to be flat in the current holiday period because of a slow start to november due to hurricane sandy. noow, trouble at saks underscores new worries spreading throughout the luxury sector about the all important holiday season. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: on manhattan's 5th avenue, it's beginning to look a lot like christm
slid 0.3% in october, more than expected, and the first decline in three months. hurricane sandy was behind at least some of the sales decline. but there are fresh worries today about the underlying strength of the american consumer. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: hurricane sandy is going to get blamed a lot in the coming weeks for soft economic data. and, rightfully so. after all the superstorm paralyzed a good chunk of the northeast for at least a week. that meant, no shopping, no eating out, and no filling up the tank. >> clearly, the retail sales data were weak and they were weak across a lot of categories. the commerce dept did talk about the affects on hurricane sandy on the numbers. but, it's hard to quantify. >> reporter: the question is whether that consumer paralysis will continue into the all important holiday retail season. many economists say that really depends on whether americans feel secure in the their jobs. here's the good news: there has recently been some improvement on the labor front. on top of that, many shoppers are finding their wallets are thicker
, more than 400,000 syrians have fled to neighboring states. it's been two weeks since hurricane sandy walloped the northeast, and, as of today, more than 130,000 homes and businesses across new york and new jersey still were in the dark. new york city mayor michael bloomberg warned again the process of restoration and recovery will be slow. . a lot of residents unfortunately will be out of power for a long time. but rather than complain about it or even write about it, we're trying to do something about it. we can sit around and bring or hands and say it's terrible. mother nature brought us this storm. now we're just going to deal with it. we're going to go methodically street by street building by building and help people get going. we're going to do the most important life-threatening things first. and then we'll come back. we're not going to stop until everybody is back. >> holman: there also were more signs of progress today, as gasoline rationing ended in central and northern new jersey. rationing continues in new york city. wall street slid again today, amid concerns about impen
of manhattan, as the area still copes from the aftermath of hurricane sandy. elsewhere, volunteers served thanksgiving meals to needy families at homeless shelters across the country, like this one in washington, d.c. turkey and all the trimmings were also served to u.s. troops overseas at bases in afghanistan and kuwait. the british broadcasting corporation appointed a new director-general in the wake of its worst crisis in years. tony hall-- a former bbc news executive and currently the head of the royal opera house-- will replace george entwistle. entwistle resigned from the post earlier this month, amid a controversy stemming from the bbc's coverage of child sex abuse. >> sreenivasan: next, reducing greece's big debt. the troubled country appears to be on track to get some much- needed aid next week. but european union leaders meeting at a summit this week are still unable to agree on how to cut greece's debt to a more sustainable level. "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman has a behind the scenes look at the efforts to do so. it's part of his ongoing reporting on "making se
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11